CONDITIONS

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Do you have a spinal condition that’s causing you chronic pain intense enough to interfere with your life or day-to-day activities? Are you afraid you’ll never be able to get your pain under control or that it might continue to worsen as you age? 

WELL, YOU’RE NOT ALONE. 

Many people with spinal disorders feel frustrated, confused, and helpless about their conditions. As many as 500,000 people suffer from some form of spinal injury each year. The good news is that you can ease your concerns and fears by gaining a better understanding of your condition. 

 

At NJ Spine and Orthopedic, we work to help you understand your symptoms, diagnose your condition and inform you of the various treatments. Below is an overview of the most common types of spine conditions, as well as other orthopedic conditions.

What Causes Back Pain?

What Causes Back Pain? Copy

Back pain is a serious issue that many Americans deal with every year. According to the American Chiropractic Association, (ACA), approximately 80% of the population will deal with back problems at some point and is a common reason to miss work and go to the doctor. There are a lot of reasons for back pain and its causes. Some can be fixed through simple changes like exercise and changing posture. However, some might require more intense solutions like surgery. When you experience back pain, it’s important to know the reasons why it might be happening. Understanding what causes back pain and your options to fix it will help you move on to get rid of back pain. What Is the Cause of Back Pain? Who gets back pain? There isn’t a specific demographic for back pain. Essentially, anyone can experience it. Back pain can be triggered through many different ways. It can come from injuries to your spine, straining muscles and tearing muscles that cause spasms. Lifting Too Much. Lifting heavy objects puts a lot of strain on your back, especially when lifted incorrectly. Fall Related Injury. These injuries are often sudden and are difficult to control because they’re done by accident. Any jerky or quick movements done to lessen the fall, or falling and hitting your back could cause back pain. Posture. If you frequently slouch, don’t have a supportive chair for work or generally have poor posture, this can result in back pain over time. Other Injuries. Sports injuries can have long-lasting pain, especially if the sport involves player contact and heavy hits. Shoes. High heels can also negatively affect your back. Technology. With society’s focus on computers and phones, it is very easy to develop poor posture for prolonged periods of time. When working, sit up straight and have a chair that provides support for your back. Slouching while typing on a computer is a bad habit to get stuck in. Take time to get up and walk around so you’re not stuck in a position for consecutive hours. When using your phone, use your arms to hold it up so you’re not bending your neck and looking down for a long time. Spinal Problems Back pain can stem from issues with the spine. These can be brought on by age or injury, and can require surgery and time to fix. Degenerative Disc Disease. Discs between your vertebrae absorb shock. Over time, these can flatten and causes pain when the nerve is upset. This problem usually affects older people, but not all older people experience it. The pain can worsen when sitting or twisting. If the pain is disabling or you start to feel numbness or tingling in your legs, you can have surgery to replace the disc. Sciatica. This pain is in the lower back and the legs, which comes from a herniated disc hurting the sciatic nerve. People with sciatica have trouble standing. The sooner you recognize you have sciatic nerve pain, then your doctor

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woman with spinal infection

October Sepsis Awareness: Spinal Infections Copy

Infections occur when bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms invade the body. Some infections clear up on their own. Unfortunately, some can cause severe or even life-threatening conditions. Compared to the common cold and flu, spinal infections are relatively rare. When someone gets a spinal infection, however, some form of treatment is often necessary. Use this guide to understand the causes and risk factors of a spinal infection. You will also discover what treatment options are available to get your life back on track. Understanding the Spine and Spinal Infections To better understand spinal infections, it helps to familiarize yourself with the spine. The spine provides support and balance to the body during movements. It also helps protect the spinal cord, nerve roots, and vital organs. The spine consists of 33 bones called vertebrae. They interlock to form the spinal column. These bones are divided into 5 regions: the cervical (or neck) region, the thoracic (or upper back) region, the lumbar ( or lower back) region, the sacral region (located near the hips), and the coccygeal (or tailbone) region. An opening runs through the middle of these bones known as the spinal canal. The spinal canal houses the spinal cord—a bundle of nerve fibers that connects the brain with the rest of the body. In addition, the spinal cord allows the brain to communicate with the rest of the nervous system. In between these vertebrae are circular discs. These intervertebral discs help to protect the bones of the spine by absorbing the shock of movement. How the Spine Becomes Infected A spinal infection normally occurs when a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection from another area of the body reaches the spine. Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium known for causing several illnesses like pneumonia and strep throat, is the most common pathogen to cause spinal infections. In fact, the methicillin-resistant strain of this bacterium, known as MRSA can account for up to 60 percent of spinal infections. Another bacterium found in the body’s natural flora, Staphylococcus epidermidis, has found to be the cause of spinal infections for those who recently received implants or pacemakers. Types of Spinal Infections Infections are typically known by the area of the spine they affect. These include: Vertebral Osteomyelitis: The most common spinal infection, which usually affects the lower back region of the spine. This infection attacks the bones of the spine, known as vertebrae. Discitis: Inflammation in the intervertebral disc space. Swelling in this area may put pressure on the discs, which in turn leads to pain. This can also cause swelling in the surrounding joints and soft tissues. Meningitis: An inflammation of delicate membranes which cover the brain and spinal cord. Viral meningitis is usually resolved without treatment. Bacterial meningitis can be contagious and even life-threatening. Spinal Epidural Abscess: An infection that develops in the space around the soft tissues which surround the spinal cord and nerve roots. The body uses white blood cells to fight the infection which causes pus to build up and create

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LETS GET IN CONTACT

For immediate assistance, please call 855.586.2615
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LETS GET IN CONTACT

For immediate assistance, please call 855.586.2615
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