Hip and Spine Fracture Survival Rates Comparable to Serious Cancers

Spine Injury

In a sobering comparison of patient outcomes, a recent study reveals that survival rates following bone fractures in older adults are akin to, if not worse than those for several types of cancer. The research, conducted on nearly 100,000 individuals aged 65 or above, draws on data from the public health care system of Ontario, Canada, to deliver a stark message regarding the severity of bone fractures in the elderly.

The findings present a grim reality; less than a third of men and half of the women survived five years after suffering a hip fracture. Even less encouraging are the numbers for octogenarians and above, where the prognosis dipped further. Although women generally had a slightly better chance of post-fracture survival compared to men, they were also more prone to fractures.

Immediate attention post-fracture was identified by researchers as a pivotal moment for medical intervention. The study points out that the dramatic decline in survival rates was most pronounced within the first month following a fracture. This critical insight underscores the necessity for rapid and effective clinical responses to improve outcomes for these patients.

In stark contrast, survival rates after various cancer diagnoses were more favorable. For example, the five-year survival rate for prostate cancer in men of any age stood at 94%, and 89% for breast cancer in women. When put side by side, these figures put into perspective the dire situation for fracture patients, particularly those advanced in age.

Source: Medical Xpress

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